Outside the Interface: Zen and the Value of Google Privacy

Today I opened something somewhere online and got another nag message from Google about its new privacy policy. The nag message invited me to “dismiss” it, a language choice that reflects a mildly amusing and disturbing political and interpersonal frame that we’ve developed with internet computing. Perhaps my amusement about being nagged over privacy derives from my almost-divorced status, but…

I’m Back

Auto-webograpical-ity. I’m waiting for Typekit to populate/propagate my font. I’m using Cooper. It’s been some time since I’ve blogged. There’s so much to say I don’t know where to begin. I’ll just chalk it up to a year lost and found. The font makes the webdesign. I have to finish rebooting things here. As always, the design reflects things about…

Where’s Neil Postman When You Need Him?

I’m contemplating teaching Neil Postman’s Amusing Ourselves to Death in my Introduction to Humanities class this semester, particularly Chapter 4 (“The Typographic Mind”). I don’t feel like scanning the chapter and I couldn’t find a pdf or doc online to use. Then it occurred to me that my students in all likelihood won’t read anything anyway, so why waste time…

Ten Tech Gratitudes for 2010

(In no particular order) 1. Droid I bought my Droid in November 2009 and it has changed how I interact with people, sometime for the worse, but usually for the better. On the one hand, even though I’m a technophile, I really don’t like the 24/7 culture of new communication technology. When I first got a cell phone, I only…

New Year’s Resolution for 2011

New Year’s Resolutions: A year in review I only remember one of my 2010 resolutions: Do a better job of staying in contact with friends. On a scale of  1 – 10, I think I managed about a 3, unless you count Facebook, which we really shouldn’t. One resolution only. That’s pretty bad. I checked my last year’s blog entry…

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Tokyo Metro

Trains provide an excellent location to study a culture. They are at the nexus of so many life patterns: work, play, family time, doctor’s visits, shopping. In a city like Tokyo, people from all walks of life take trains, unlike in the US where there’s a distinct distaste for mass transportation in all but the largest cities.  You can learn…