Finding Found Money on the Internet

When surfing the internet, I often do strange things I might not otherwise do. Like spend money. Well, no, actually I spend money all the time. My husband says I hemorrhage money. On the internet, when your credit card account is saved and all you have to do is hit enter, spending money becomes oh-so-easy. And isn’t that the point?

So, here’s another confession: I paid to join Classmates.com. No point in putting a link to them since they advertise incessantly, but what’s a blog without links? Classmates.com sends annoying emails telling you that someone from your school just joined. Utterly annoying. High school sucked. Why did I waste my money? Blame it on a click-happy haze of nostalgia.

Classmates.com advertises another site, Foundmoney.com. Woohoo! Three accounts in my name, one of which had over $2000.00 in it. Of course, it costs $20.00 to get more information. I stupidly attempted to buy it, even though my husband groaned, “you’re hemorrhaging us over a scam!” (with $20.00; he has a flair for the dramatic). The whole website appears to be screwed up. The thing wouldn’t process my credit card. So I decided to find some other found money sites and these are my discoveries:

Missingmoney.Com — This is a free site sponsored by the National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators. It is a non-profit organization. This site helped me to track down some smaller accounts. I still can’t find the 2k.

Unclaimed property: Free Found Money — Some guy made this site after he spent 20.00 at Foundmoney.com and learned it was a ripoff. (See, my husband was right! It sucks when he’s right). This site compiles links to all the unclaimed property offices from each state.

Found Money — They advertised on Oprah! Maybe she will sue them. It costs 20.00 to join, but right now the website is broken. Perhaps they’ll advise how to collect my 2k. Also, don’t be fooled. They also own nonprofitexpert.com.

Unclaimed Services — This site is very sleazy. You have to click three pages deep to get any information. The clicks are similar to the old salesman trick: Get someone to nod as often as possible, and before they know it, they’re nodding yes to a vacuum cleaner.

AARP: The Pigeon Drop — This was an accidental find in the search for “found money.” The pigeon drop is a scam in which the hook is someone pretending to find money in a bag. It’s an interesting scam. The AARP has a long list of other scams as well. Fun reading. They should add Foundmoney.com to their list.

Unclaimed Money Kit — This is a software kit that you can use to create your own unclaimed money scam!! Yes. It’s true!

Findcash.com — They found three accounts for me and tried to charge to retrieve the information. After following a few links, they led back to Foundmoney.com. All roads lead to Rome.

Findmoney.com — A list of links to found money sites, most of which eventually lead back to Foundmoney.com. Do you sense a theme here? I still haven’t found my 2k.

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